Volume 33, No. 3 — Spring 2019

Volume 33, No. 3 — Spring 2019
Cover Story

Why We Should Teach Reconstruction

Unfortunately, the transformative history of Reconstruction has been buried. First by a racist tale masquerading as history and now under a top-down narrative focused on white elites. It’s long overdue we unearth the groundswell of activity that brought down the slavers of the South and set a new standard for freedom we are still struggling to achieve today.

Why We Should Teach Reconstruction
Features

40 Acres and a Mule

Role-playing what Reconstruction could have been

A high school teacher uses a role play so students can imagine life during Reconstruction, the possibilities of the post-Civil War era, and the difficult decisions that Black communities had to wrestle with.

40 Acres and a Mule

The School Formerly Known as LeConte

A debate in Berkeley about the power of a name

Across the United States, we are toppling monuments and former heroes. Past icons are rightfully crashing — in esteem and in our public and private spaces — as we begin the overdue process of reckoning with history. Contemporary heroes are being lowered, too. This vogue of name controversies might be seen as a petty preoccupation by detractors, but what could be a more powerful symbol than what we choose to name a school?

The School Formerly Known as LeConte

How Should We Sing Happy Birthday?

Reconsidering classroom birthday celebrations

A kindergarten teacher looks at birthday celebrations in her classroom and whether all of her students’ home languages and rituals are being uplifted.

How Should We Sing Happy Birthday?

Women of the Day

A high school teacher looks at how a daily activity focusing on the representation of women helped transform her classroom.

Women of the Day

When Showing Up Isn't Showing Up

A language arts teacher describes a school board debate in which she merely showed up, instead of showing up and fighting for communities of color.

When Showing Up Isn't Showing Up
Special Section: The third edition of The New Teacher book is out now

Introducing the New, New Teacher Book

We need teachers who want to work in a place where human connections matter more than profit. We also wrote this book because we have had days — many days — where our teaching aspirations did not meet the reality of the chaos we encountered. We have experienced those late afternoons crying-alone-in-the-classroom kind of days when a lesson failed or we felt like our students hosted a party in the room and we were the uninvited guests. We wrote this book hoping it might offer solace and comfort on those long days when young teachers wonder if they are cut out to be a teacher at all.

Introducing the New, New Teacher Book

Honor Their Names

Students’ names are the first thing teachers know about the young people who enter our classrooms; they can signal country of origin, gender, language. Students’ names provide the first moment when a teacher can demonstrate their warmth and humanity, their commitment to seeing and welcoming students’ languages and cultures into the classroom.

Honor Their Names
Departments
Commentary

Our House Is on Fire — Time to Teach Climate Justice

Column: Earth, Justice, and Our Classrooms
Education Action

'Billionaires Can't Teach Our Kids'

Why the Los Angeles teachers' strike was historic

Black Lives Matter at School Week of Action

An uprising for racial justice in education

Children Deserve Classrooms, Not Cages

A “Teach-In for Freedom” is organized by Teachers Against Child Detention.