Table of Contents

Welcome to the Rethinking Schools Archives and Website

Become a subscriber or online account holder to read this article and hundreds more. Learn more.
Already a subscriber or account holder? Log in here.

Preview of Article:

Bring the War Home -- to Our Classrooms

Bring the War Home -- to Our Classrooms

A slick, full-color print ad that has appeared in numerous publications features a child writing on a chalk board: "A histery of Irak" with a caption punch line: "Debating Iraq is tough. Spelling it shouldn't be."

The ad is part of a massive $60 million public relations campaign financed by the Gates and Broad foundations, called Ed in '08. The ad is disingenuous — as is the entire campaign (see editorial).

As a classroom teacher, I have no problem with the notion that kids should be able to spell the words "history" and "Iraq." But I am even more interested that they understand something about the history of the Iraq War.

There is no indication that even a penny of the Gates money or any of the policies of Ed in '08 encourage teachers or schools to debate the war in our nation's classrooms. In fact, since September 2001, a nearly McCarthy-like "anti-terrorism" atmosphere in schools and society, combined with an obscene obsession with standardized testing and factual minutia, have left most substantive classroom conversations behind.

There is another campaign however — running on a shoestring budget — that is encouraging people to not only talk about and discuss the war, but to act on their beliefs.

To Read the Rest of This Article:

Become a subscriber or online account holder to read this article and hundreds more. Learn more.
Already a subscriber or account holder? Log in here.