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Why the Best Kids’ Books Are Written in Blood

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CONTENTS
Vol. 26, No.1


COVER STORIES • Still Fighting for All Our Children

Blowin' in the Wind

By the editors of Rethinking Schools

The Birth of Rethinking Schools
By Bob Peterson

Rethinking Schools and the Power of Silver
By Christine Sleeter


FEATURES


For or Against Children?
The Problematic History of Stand for Children
By Ken Libby and Adam Sanchez

Trigger Laws: Does Signing a Petition Give Parents a Voice?
By David Bacon

Patterns and Punctuation
Learning to Question Language
By Elizabeth Schlessman

‘Before Today, I Was Afraid of Trees’
Rethinking Nature Deficit Disorder
By Doug Larkin

Why the Best Kids’ Books Are Written in Blood
By Sherman Alexie

What Do You Mean When You Say Urban?
Speaking Honestly About Race and Students
By Dyan Watson

It’s OK to Be Neither
Teaching That Supports Gender-Variant Children
By Melissa Bollow Tempel

The New Model of Teacher Evaluation: How Would Ms. Frizzle Fare?
By Marni Barron and Leigh Dingerson


COLUMNS and DEPARTMENTS


A LETTER TO OUR READERS

LETTERS TO THE EDITORS

ACTION EDUCATION 
SOS March Builds Pushback to Corporate Reform
By Stan Karp

GOOD STUFF
Keywords
By Herb Kohl

RESOURCES


Got an idea for an article? Got an idea for a letter? Contact Jody Sokolower, policy and publications editor:
jody@rethinkingschools.org

 

Fall 2011


By Sherman Alexie

This article is available only in the print version of Rethinking Schools magazine, volume 26 issue 1.


Sherman Alexie is the author of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, winner of the 2007 National Book Award in Young People’s Literature. He is currently at work on a sequel. Copyright © 2011 Sherman Alexie. All rights reserved. Reprinted with permission of the author. This article is a response to Meghan Cox Gurdon’s essay, “Darkness Too Visible,” in the Wall Street Journal, June 4, 2011.